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Arizona Medicare Advantage Plans

According to the latest statistics, a huge amount amount of retired people find Arizona the best place to live because of the warm climate and medical facilities. Millions of residents are depending upon the Medicare for health and life insurances. Since basic Medicare plan doesn’t cover everything, people may want Medigap or Medicare advantage plans.

Arizona is only state which has the most amount of Medicare recipients. Phoenix, Tucson and Mesa are the largest cities of Arizona and there are about 15% Arizonians who are 65 years and up receiving Medicare and about 14% Arizonians receiving Medicare. Almost all seniors are dependent on Medicare benefits for health insurance. Among all the senior citizens, approximately 30% will choose the Arizona Medicare Advantage plans. The other 25% will choose Medigap plan instead. The remainder may have a different public or private coverage, but most do not just rely on Part A and Part B Medicare, because they want to ensure that health care costs remain affordable.

Anyone choosing Medicare insurance or any other type of health insurance needs to strike a balance between premiums and benefits. Medicare Advantage plans for Arizona are attractive because many still have a very low or even $ 0 premium surcharge. Medicare Advantage plans also include Part D drug coverage at no additional cost.

On the other hand, these cheaper plans have many co-pays and deductibles. Also many recipients operate on a tight budget during retirement. Everyone has their own plans for retirement, for some people it makes more sense to pay a hefty amount for the Medigap insurances that covers all the health expenses that are not originally covered in Medicare.

Interestingly, Medicare supplement insurance plans C and F are usually the most expensive but they are also the most popular among the people who purchase supplements.

As a beneficiary, you are free to enroll in any Medicare Advantage plans you like. All the plans offer health benefits under Part A and Part B both. Many Medicare Advantage plans also cover prescription drug coverage (Part D). Additional benefits can also be utilized by paying an extra cost on your Medicare advantage plan. You may qualify for these plans if you are entitled to Medicare Part A and enrolled in Medicare Part B.
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There are many private companies who offer Medigap plans for senior citizens. People can easily sign up for one of several Medicare advantage plans if they want to receive the most of their medical insurance coverage company. Keep in mind that if you are going for Medicare advantage plan, you must be enrolled in Medicare Part A and B.

Secondly, you must be living in the area where they have Medicare network providing advantage plans. Most Medicare Advantage plans have prescription drug coverage built into the plan. This is not always the case, because it may be what is called stand-alone Part D plan.

Many people join the Medicare advantage plan as soon they turn 65. This process is called open enrollment period when you have only six months to enroll in the plan. After registration, if you want to change your plan, you’ll have to wait until the annual election period, which occurs every year from October 15 to December 7th. During this time, you can switch plans or return to original Medicare options, for this year you will not be able to move out of your plan, or join a new Medicare Advantage plans for 2016 outside of that enrollment period.

Type of Medicare Advantage Plans:

Below listed are some of the main advantage plans available across the United States:

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO):
Health Maintenance Organization plan only allows  you to select certain doctors and hospitals within the network. Unless it’s an emergency, only then can you go to those approved locations. If you plan to visit someone outside your network, it will not be covered under your plan and it will be charged separately.

Preferred Provider Organization (PPO):
Preferred Provider Organization plan allows you to save your money by selecting the specified doctor and healthcare provider or hospital. You will be required to pay a bit more if you wish to go to those that are not on the list of approved providers.

 Private Fee for Service (PPFS):
Private Fee for Service a plan which does not require you to go to an approved list of providers. Instead, you will have the choice to select any provider you want. The only drawback is that there are very few people who accepts the PPFS plan.

Special Needs Plans (SNPs):
Special Needs Plans are basically designed for the people who have some specific and severe disabilities and diseases. The list of accepted providers is made on the needs of the subscriber and who will be able to fulfill their needs.

Every Medicare advantage plan is created to operate on a network. It means that all health care providers will be located within a specific area. You are required to live in the local area if you want to get covered by a certain plan. If you move to a new area, you may change your provider or insurance plan, depending on where you moved and what type of network is used.

Medicare Advantage Premiums To Decrease For 2011

In something of a surprise announcement, Donald Berwick, Director of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, says that premiums for Medicare Advantage plans will decrease slightly in 2011. Berwick says that the monthly costs for MA plans for more than 11 million enrollees will drop by about 1%. In addition, enrollees should see some relief from the cost of prescription drugs and the continuation of certain no-cost preventative health care services.

In 2009, premiums for Medicare Advantage plans increased by an average of 15%. Berwick and other Medicare officials say that the health care reform act has provided the Medicare and Medicaid Service with additional negotiating power. Initially, officials used their newfound clout to drop about 300 previously approved Medicare insurance plans offered by private providers. According to Medicare officials, the rejected plans increased out-of-pocket costs without increasing benefits or covered services.

Most of the insurers then modified the plans to provide additional services at reduced costs. Upon reconsideration of the new offers, Medicare approved most of the 300 rejected plans. Fewer than ten of the original 300 rejected plans did not modify their initial proposed coverage, improve their benefits or reduce beneficiaries’ proposed out-of-pocket expenses. Upon review, these plans were rejected a second time and will not be offered in 2011.

Some analysts say that insurance providers are more willing to negotiate with Medicare because they are more dependent now upon Medicare premiums than they had been in the past; a large number of new enrollees are expected in the next decade; and the new health care legislation will open new opportunities for providers in the coming years.

Seniors who have elected Medicare Part D (prescription drug coverage) can also expect to see some decreases in their out-of-pocket expenses if they have significant prescription costs in 2011. The relief comes as part of the Obama Administration’s effort to eliminate the “donut hole” gap in Medicare prescription drug coverage. Reduced out-of-pocket expenses for Part D benefits will not translate into lower Part D premiums, however. Part D premiums are expected to rise in 2011 for most prescription drug plans.

3.75M Medicare Recipients Will Get Donut Hole Check In 2010

According to figures released by the administration, more than 750,000 checks for $250 have already been mailed this summer to Medicare recipients who have exceeded their basic Medicare Part D benefits. The so-called “donut hole” is a gap in prescription drug coverage that will cause beneficiaries to pay the entire cost of their prescription drugs once their basic benefits are exhausted but before catastrophic drug coverage kicks in. Basic Medicare Part D coverage is exhausted when the beneficiary and his or her insurance company have spent a combined total of $2,830 on prescription medications in a single coverage year.

The problematic coverage lapse isn’t a minor issue. An estimated 3 million more checks will be mailed out before the end of the year, as more seniors qualify for the one-time rebate. The $250 check is the administration’s first step toward closing the donut hole altogether, a process that’s expected to take nearly ten years. Beginning next year, the cost of most prescription drugs will be halved for beneficiaries whose basic coverage runs out. Eventually, the gap will be eliminated entirely, and beneficiaries will maintain annual prescription drug benefits with no gaps in the coverage.

As part of the “gap reduction” plan in 2011, Medicare will “streamline” its Part D plans, which may mean fewer Part D plans to choose from. One of the new Part D rules for 2011 limits carriers from offering more than one Part D plan in a single coverage area. Medicare’s goal with the new rules is to reduce the number of confusing choices that confront beneficiaries during the annual enrollment period, but this may force nearly three million seniors enrolled in popular drug plans, such as the multiple Part D options offered by AARP and CVS-Caremark, to switch plans.

The AARP released a study last month that contradicted the Medicare administration claims that reforms will lower the cost of prescription drugs. In the AARP’s study of brand name drug costs, the organization said that in the last five years, the cost of the most popular prescription medications rose by 41.5%, more than tripling the 13.3% rise in the consumer price index for the same time period. Drug makers say that the AARP is being alarmist regarding the price of brand name drugs because about three-fourths of consumers in the US use lower-cost generic drug formulations.

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