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Medicare beneficiaries

Shedding Light On Arizona’s Medigap Policies

In Arizona, medical beneficiaries who are in need of help for paying Medicare expenses must consider enrolling in a Medicare Supplement Plan known as Medigap Plan. It must be noted that Medigap plans are available through private insurance companies, not only in Arizona but in every state across U.S.

Medigap plans generally help with the expenses which are incurred under original Medicare plans which are Plan A and Plan B. Medigap plans are now almost same across all of the United States in terms of both policies and cost. For those of you who are not sure about the number of Medigap plans, just know that there are 10 standardized Medigap plans available in all of the states. The plans are labelled from A to N where Plan A and Plan B are the most basic plans which every state offers under the rule of federal administration.

If you are already enrolled original Medicare Plan A and B, then you are eligible to sign up for Medigap Plans. Not many people know but the best time to buy a Medicare Supplement plan is during the Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts as soon as you reach the age of 65 and is also enrolled in Medicare Plan B. Individuals can sign up for any Medigap plans during this time according to the plans available in their state. The important thing to keep in mind is that there are no additional enrollment periods besides each of theirs Medigap Open Enrollment Period.

In Arizona and across all of the United States, Medigap plans doesn’t include prescription drug coverage, so you have to enroll in a Part D plan for prescription for separate Medicare to cover the cost of medicines or drugs. Prescription drug plans for Medicare Part D in Arizona are available through private insurance companies.
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It has been observed through the survey that Arizona is the most famous destination to retire. Surprisingly, above a million residents of Arizona are dependent on the Medicare for their main source of health insurance.While no revolutionary changes in Medicare supplement insurance is scheduled for 2016, there are some things to keep in mind which may affect the safety and availability of certain plans.

Here is the possible increase in premiums and Part B deductible. For example, Plan C, Plan F, and high deductible Plan F covers Part B deductible, so if the increased rates for these popular supplements may also increase. In Arizona, all the Medicare Supplement Plans must conform to the standards set by the Medicare Organization. Supplement standards include names from A to N. Each supplement offers basic benefits like coinsurance and blood donations. The only thing to remember is that every supplement is identical from one or another insurance company. In order to determine rates, you must compare different insurers providing Medigap plans however there should not be a big difference because of the Arizona Medigap Policy.  It is important that you familiarize yourself before  with the Medigap plan as well as each and every plan before you make any purchase. 

Supplement Plan F is the most comprehensive among the 10 other plans, covering almost 100 % of Medicare related costs. But even for Medicare Supplement Plan F recipients in Arizona can still incur some out – of -pocket expenses such as Medicare Part B premium.

As soon as you reach the age of 65, you need only a phone call to buy Medigap policy and get excellent coverage without question. And if you buy a policy in the first six months of enrolling in Medicare, you do not have to answer questions about your health. Do not worry if your doctors are not in the network, because you will be covered if you see any doctor who accepts Medicare.

Many people don’t realize the fact that how much they will be spending if they will be selecting the plan which covers the entire Medigap plans. There are total of 10 Medigap plans and each one has its own benefit. The four most comprehensive plans are C, D, F and G which account for more than 60% of all the Medigap sales according to Kaiser Family Foundation research. Plan F, the most expensive among all of them and covers every Medicare gap represents 40% of all policies sold. If your health is good than you must consider a plan which is not much comprehensive for e.g. Plan N and L are good choices because they will save you around $200 to $400 a year.

Medicare and Medigap benefits are identical in all 50 states, however policies and pricing rules may differ (Massachusetts, Minnesota and Wisconsin have their own standardized plans). If you know the rules in your state,  this may save you money.  You can choose when to upgrade an existing plan to switch to another insurer or drop your current Medicare plan during the annual open enrollment to change Medigap policies.

Most of the people become eligible for Medicare when they turn 65, although some beneficiaries can get Medicare even before if they have some kind of disability. You will automatically get Medicare as soon as you turn 65 if you are already receiving Social Security benefits. Otherwise, you will have to enroll in Medicare during the enrollment period.

There are also many private Medicare options available if you are a Medicare beneficiary in Arizona. Medicare coverage like drug prescription and supplemental coverage are only available through private insurance companies. Your private Medicare options will depend on where you live and the plans available in your area. We hope you found this article helpful as we shed light on Arizona’s Medigap policies. If you are an Arizona resident, feel free to contact www.azmedicare.info for further details. 

How Good Is Your Medicare Health Insurance Coverage?

Medicare health insurance is generally designed to offer some coverage for hospitalization and routine health care, but it does not offer complete coverage for most services. In some cases, health care services you may need or want might not be covered at all, or may be covered only in limited circumstances.

Another consideration for Medicare beneficiaries is that not every health care provider accepts Medicare insurance. There is no requirement that doctors or hospitals accept Medicare. Many do, however based on recent and proposed changes in Medicare payment to providers, some doctors and hospitals are limiting the number of Medicare patients they’re accepting, and some providers have said that they will no longer accept Medicare.

When you enroll in Medicare, it’s important to decide how much you want to stay with your current doctor(s), hospital and/or pharmacy. Don’t make assumptions about your health care providers. You may need to ask each provider you see whether or not s/he accepts Medicare. If your provider does not accept Medicare, you may need to ask for a referral to another provider who does accept Medicare, or cover your health care costs from that provider out-of-pocket.

If you’re enrolled in traditional Medicare Part A and Part B, you can choose your health provider. Assuming your provider accepts Medicare, you can see the doctor(s) you want to see and receive services at your choice of hospitals that participate in the Medicare insurance program.

If you’re enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, you may have to choose your doctor(s), hospital(s) and pharmacies based on a list of participating providers who have been approved by your Medicare Advantage plan provider. In this way, Medicare Advantage plans are much like a health maintenance organization (HMO). If you choose to go out of your Medicare Advantage provider network, you could end up paying most or all of the costs associated with your care by yourself.

In short, not all health care providers accept Medicare, and not all services are covered. With traditional Medicare Part A and Part B coverage, you can purchase additional Medicare Supplemental Insurance to fill in some of the coverage gaps. With Medicare Advantage plans, some of these gaps are already filled in, but you may pay extra premiums with these plans, or you may find a limited network of health care providers whose services are covered by your Medicare Advantage plan.

2011 Medicare Part D Choices Require Research Says Firm

Avalere Health, a healthcare policy research firm, says that Medicare beneficiaries must do some research before making their Medicare Part D plan election for 2011.  The company says that significant changes await some enrollees, even if they elect the same Part D provider they had in 2010.  According to the company, many Medicare Part D providers have changed their formularies and co-pay costs, meaning that some drugs that were covered in 2010 may not be covered in 2011.

One of the more noticeable changes may be in the way providers structure co-pays.  According to Avalere Health, more providers are structuring their Part D plans with five or more tiers, which will allow providers to charge different co-pays for drugs in different plan tiers.  The number of tiered plans has risen from 27% in 2009 to more than 40% in 2011.  Some plans that already use tiered payment structures have two different tiers for generic drugs.

Another major change for consumers will be in their choice of pharmacy.  Some Part D plans will use preferred pharmacies and will base consumer out-of-pocket costs not only on the prescribed drugs, but also on whether or not prescriptions are filled at a participating pharmacy.  Consumers who use non-plan pharmacies may find themselves paying up to 50% more in out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs.

More Part D plans are also using pre-authorization and limiting the quantity of medications that can be dispensed at one time, creating an overall higher cost to the consumer for pharmaceuticals in the form of additional co-pays.  The end result of these changes is a net decrease in the number of drugs covered by the top ten prescription drug plans (PDP) for 2011.

Among the top ten plans, the 2011 formularies cover between 50% and 87% of prescription drugs.  To illustrate the potential impact of changes among drug plans, Avalere’s analysis shows that while the AARP’s 2011 formulary covers four popular rheumatoid arthritis drugs with a 33% cost-share, Humana-WalMart’s 2011 formulary covers only two of the four drugs and has a 35% cost-share on the covered formulations. In addition, the cost-share at non-preferred pharmacies is significantly higher.  Enrollees must pay out-of-pocket for drugs not covered by their provider’s formulary. More information about the Avalere Health study can be found at AvalereHealth.net.

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